myhaircrush:

by @ynotkeeb via @InstaReposts

(via strongblackbrotha)

myhaircrush:

by @innamodjaofficiel “Shooting en mode #Castelbajac au Comptoir Général” via @InstaReposts

(via strongblackbrotha)

curvesincolor:

She gorgeous. 

(via black-culture)

curly-essence:

http://curlyessence.com/

(via black-culture)

seventribesmagazine:

CHERELLA GESSEL
Photo & concept by Fana Richters

(via black-culture)

ourblackproject:

Black bodies have been dehumanized since our horrific introduction with European culture and white supremacy. The white gaze has despised, violated and objectified the Black female body. The narrow European (and Black) standards of beauty have to be dismantled all together. Not all Black women have big hips and big butts. Not all have small waists. This photo set, though only limited by the amount of photos that could be uploaded, attempts to broaden that standard of beauty to include Black women of all shapes and sizes. 

I remember by the begining of middle school I prayed so hard that God would make me light skin ›

ourblackproject:

I’m of Ghanaian heritage (west coast Africa) somewhere along my mother’s ancestry there was a white man and that’s where she gained her fair light skin. My Father on the other hand my father is dark skin as his father and mother before him and so on. I never really thought of my skin color as…

I remember by the begining of middle school I prayed so hard that God would make me light skin ›

ourblackproject:

I’m of Ghanaian heritage (west coast Africa) somewhere along my mother’s ancestry there was a white man and that’s where she gained her fair light skin. My Father on the other hand my father is dark skin as his father and mother before him and so on. I never really thought of my skin color as…

“Black people don’t do that.” and “You act white” are phrases we may have heard used or had hurled at some point in time for behaving outside a strictly defined notion of Blackness. Many have narrow definitions of what it means to be Black, and those that fall outside of that scope aren’t being Black “enough”. Have you experienced being told you aren’t Black enough?

When I Realized I was Black

ourblackproject:

In third grade I moved from a diverse school in Maryland to an essentially all-White school in Texas. On the first day a girl asked me, “Are you from Africa?” I remember being in shock and thinking, “Am I the first Black person you’ve ever met? Don’t you know Black people live in America?” and I’ve hated Texas ever since.